michaelw
I am new to my company (and the industry for that matter). A lot of the senior sellers at my company will use lines like "I have x years of experience in the industry" to build trust with their clients. I obviously don't have that luxury. Any ideas on communicating value even though I am a newbie? I want to build trust with my customers. 
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Dave_T
It is always tough being new and having to act like the 'expert'. However, my advice would definitely be not to lie or pretend like you know what you are talking about if you do not actually know. I would leverage your newness to your advantage by asking 'dumb' questions. You can get away with asking some really helpful qualification questions tied to you being new.

As far as providing value, I would assure your customers that you have access to whatever necessary resources and tools to ensure they will be successful. The message being "If I don't know, I will be sure to find someone for you that does know.". As long as you keep the customer's experience as the first priority, you can't go wrong. 
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michaelw
Hi Dave, and thanks for your reply. That makes sense and I appreciate your perspective. I would never want to lie or pretend I knew something that I actually did not, because I know that always comes back to bite you in the ass! 

Would you mind giving me an example or two of the qualification questions you mentioned that I may be able to ask as a new employee that will be helpful for me?
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Dave_T
Sure. You could ask things like, "As your new account engineer, I am hoping to get familiarized with your company to best support you moving forward. Tell me about how your group/department is structured?" or "How are project priorities determined for your group?" or "What is the typical purchasing process? Do you need to get approval from anyone?" things like that. Always position why you are asking these questions, maybe even throw in some examples such as "I know some customers have a $5k purchase limit before having to jump through extra hoops with procurement." etc.

This is certainly not an inclusive list, but hopefully the ideas are making sense. [smile]
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sidman1324
michaelw wrote:
I am new to my company (and the industry for that matter). A lot of the senior sellers at my company will use lines like "I have x years of experience in the industry" to build trust with their clients. I obviously don't have that luxury. Any ideas on communicating value even though I am a newbie? I want to build trust with my customers. 


I am in the same boat as well - very interesting to read the replies. after some time, we will be the experts too [smile] 
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Mike Cartwright
Great question!

One of the best tips I learned about building trust with prospects was from Grant Cardone. And I used when I first started in the sales industry. He said that you just need to agree with them. If you have a choice of being right or agreeing, you have to choose to agree. Grant Cardone added that there's a misconception that two people are needed to have a deal or an agreement. But it only needs one.

That lesson changed my sales outlook from then on.
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Davidtogo
michaelw wrote:
I am new to my company (and the industry for that matter). A lot of the senior sellers at my company will use lines like "I have x years of experience in the industry" to build trust with their clients. I obviously don't have that luxury. Any ideas on communicating value even though I am a newbie? I want to build trust with my customers. 


Huh that's an interesting read Michael: Because in my experience (my!) the best salespeople do not talk any such details (unless for a specific customer it is helpful) because generally it does nothing to close a deal, not even to open the door, or get past the gatekeeper.

I tell you what I would do if new (and I did): You really shine, way more than any "oldie", by getting to know your product in detail. In detail (oldies rarely bother). Then observe. Observe. Observe. Look around their office (if they have one). SEE everything. Combine the dots, identify their hobby, children, ... Read what they published, if anything, etc.

Then use both strings of information/knowledge to introduce yourself with sth THEY like, THEY need to know. Based on your observations. You almost instantly strike a friend if it works. And if you did your "homework" it works mostly. Exception: some people are immune to "humanizing" the sales meeting, or they just may not "like" you, or... But those are few. Mostly it works.

Is that helpful?
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aarantes
Davidtogo wrote:



I tell you what I would do if new (and I did): You really shine, way more than any "oldie", by getting to know your product in detail. In detail (oldies rarely bother). Then observe. Observe. Observe. Look around their office (if they have one). SEE everything. Combine the dots, identify their hobby, children, ... Read what they published, if anything, etc.

Then use both strings of information/knowledge to introduce yourself with sth THEY like, THEY need to know. Based on your observations. You almost instantly strike a friend if it works. And if you did your "homework" it works mostly. Exception: some people are immune to "humanizing" the sales meeting, or they just may not "like" you, or... But those are few. Mostly it works.



It's sounds like a stalker but it makes sense, I just read a customer's article at LinkedIn and when I was in a meeting with him I started to talk about his post and we had a great conversation about some points and after that we're get along with each other, so today it's common for to receive a call to validate current and future jobs.

I think the most important it's to understand the customer business, because let's say you're providing a solution A to customer A but the project is being very hard to start because they need to solve a specific problem and you, like a hero, have a good relationship with a customer B that is able to solve easily the problem and you invite both customers(A and B) for a lunch business... and what is the advantage here? you're in the middle of WIN-WIN relationship between them, acting as a trust advisor. I make sure your future projects with both companies will be very, very fruitful.
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James Anderson
Yes, experience matters, but customer satisfaction always remains at the top. Everyone goes through the phase when they need to work as fresher without any sort of experience. Just learn to behave with them in a correct manner and go ahead. Good luck!
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